Tuesday, July 17, 2018

DEATH RACE BAJA 1000! 41 Years of DEATH Friends of SCORE BFGoodrich Tires November 2018 Baja Racing News EXCLUSIVE

UPDATED! July 17, 2018

BF Goodrich Tires promotes a racing sanction, SCORE-International, that reportedly has no real racers insurance, operates against international law, violates its own rules and kills scores of entrants and spectators alike? 

We'll document the carnage and report LIVE! from Baja Mexico during the event in November, this year. 

Death Race BAJA 1000 2018

The SHAM SCORE 'INSURANCE'!

Holly Buck-Luhtala: April 2; "It’s been 16 months [Now 19] since Mark died after his accident at the Baja 1000 [2016]. I have crazy hospital bills & ambulance/aircraft bills from getting him from Mexico to San Diego (around $600,000 in total). To date we have received nothing from the insurance he paid for through 'Score International'. Regarding 'Fast-Aid', have no idea what was actually donated."
  
 Holly continues:
"These racers pay to race then pay the insurance and I’m proof that just when you don’t think it can happen to you it does! It rips me to shreds knowing he was the greatest give you the shirt off his back kind of guy and he was offered NO help except for his race crew and one medic without supplies. The insurance proved to not be worth the paper it was apparently written on. I am broken and beat down but must stand up for him as he can no longer and it’s my turn to fight for what’s right. My girls don’t have their dad now this, HELL NO!"

Roger Norman is responsible for this entire mess!

The Racers violating SCORE 'rules' and breaking local, state, national and international laws, driving through spectator areas! Running over and KILLING people and the racers/perps run from the death scene, crossing to the USA for their mommas tit!



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The San Felipe 250 2018 OUTRAGE!
SCORE SILENCE NOW!  
ROGER BALL-GAGGED??
SPECIAL REPORT SAN FELIPE 2018 NEGLIGENCE?

UPDATE! June 14, 2018
Finally, a real journalist digs up the REAL STORY! The Driver and co-driver ran from the death scene>>>CLICK HERE>>> 

SCORE FRAUD? SCORE NEGLIGENCE? SCORE BUTCHERY? CLICK HERE TO SEE ROGER HIDE FOR COVER! 

Racer Matt Scarpuzzi Goes Public,
BJ Baldwin GAGS on his Answers 
--------------------------------
***UPDATED! CLICK HERE FOR THE LOCAL SAN DIEGO COVERAGE WITH John Soderman TV Report KUSI 51/Cable Channel 9 ***


How do 'some' of the racers really feel about killing people, this note from BJ Baldwin:

How 'some' of the racers really feel about running over human beings, from buckwild. BJ Baldwin wrote this in 2015 after Apdaly Lopez took out a spectators truck at the SCORE sanctioned BAJA 500. No penalties were given to the racer by SCORE International the racing sanction.

 During the last BAJA 1000 in 2017, Robby Gordon said on the SCORE microphone at contingency, "We are going to run you over!". Talking to the spectators about how the racers have no questions about striking and killing human beings. Baja Racing News LIVE! has been reporting on this subject for years.

*Sandra Dibble's journalistic masterpiece!
   -Courtesy San Diego Union:




By: Sandra Dibble, San Diego Union

"It happened in an instant. Omar Coronado and Abelardo Padilla were chatting and snapping photos of the SCORE San Felipe 250 off-road race, friends said, unaware of the powerful Trophy Truck hurtling toward them. By the time they realized the danger, it was too late: the childhood friends were killed instantly on a warm Saturday afternoon last month at this rugged and unpopulated spot southeast of Ensenada.

But their companions say that what happened next has compounded the tragedy: The US driver and his navigator left the scene about 15 minutes after the accident, driven away by members of their team, well before authorities arrived to investigate what happened, they said.“People were saying, 'Don't take them, where are you taking them?' ” said Guillermo Delgado, who was among their group of seven friends who had pulled over to watch the race off a federal road that leads toward Ensenada. There was little doubt as to the racing team's identity.

Photographs from the scene showed the “Terrible Herbst” Trophy Truck with the number 91. In a video interview before the race, Ed Herbst, part of a Las Vegas family prominent in off-road racing circles, said he would be driving the vehicle.

Off-road racing is a decades-old tradition in Baja California, one that brings economic benefits to communities such as San Felipe, draws enthusiastic local crowds, and gives the region worldwide exposure. The annual Baja 1000 is the best known of some 30 off-road racing events that take place in the state.

“It's more than races, it's a culture for Baja California,” said Oscar Escobedo, Baja California's Tourism Secretary. But last month's incident has underscored the sport's inherent dangers — both to drivers and spectators — and the need both for clearer rules and rapid response from law enforcement authorities when incidents occur. Omar Coronado, left, and Abelardo Padilla, photographed moments before they were struck by a vehicle in the San Felipe 250 off-road race.Omar Coronado, left, and Abelardo Padilla, photographed moments before they were struck on April 7 by a vehicle in the San Felipe 250 off-road race. A proposed regulation that would delineate responsibilties for the public's safety in off-road races has languished in draft form for two years without approval by the state legislature, said Antonio Rosquillas, the state's civil protection chief. Within urban areas, the draft rules assigns responsibility for ensuring safety to the racers, race promoters and the municipal authorities. But “out in the desert, in the mountains, it is up to the public to respond,” said Rosquillas. “When you know there's a race with vehicles going at 100 miles per hour, you have to look for a safe place where you wouldn't be hurt if a vehicle leaves the road.”Those familiar with off-road racing in Baja California tell of fans who put themselves in harm's way — dangerously close to the powerful off-road vehicles as they barrel through the rough, uneven landscape. “Locals try to touch the race cars as they go by, or they'll get way under a hole and have the trucks jump over them,” said Chasen Gaunt, a 21-year-old racer from Torrance. “It's part of Mexico racing, that's the way racers look at it. It's just another obstacle we've got to overcome.”Guillermo Delgado and his brother Raúl Delgado, both schoolteachers, have been watching races for years.“We've always criticized this, people who go to the races, walk onto the race course, take photos, leading to accidents,” said Guillermo Delgado, who teaches elementary school in eastern Tijuana. “On that day, we lost our sense of caution.”The Delgado brothers had been among a group of seven spectators — six men and an 11-year-old boy — that included the two victims. 
Coronado, 39, was a schoolteacher, who played soccer, loved traditional Mexican folk dancing and lived with his parents in San Vicente. Padilla, 38, also from San Vicente had a spouse and young child, and worked at Valentina's, his mother's restaurant on the Transpeninsular Highway. On the morning of April 7, the friends left San Vicente, squeezing into Padilla's four-door Toyota Tundra, to see the races. By early afternoon, they decided to prepare a carne asada by the 154-kilometer marker of Highway 3, southeast of Ensenada. The San Felipe 250 participants were racing right by that spot, down a rough unpaved road that runs parallel to the paved road. The group set up camp about 30 feet from the course, and prepared lunch. Though several members of the group had been drinking beer, consumption had been moderate, Delgado said; Coronado, who was the designated driver, had not been drinking at all. While the rest remained behind at the picnic area, Coronado and Padilla stepped close to the course, standing roughly a yard away, Delgado said. “When a vehicle passed, they took pictures,” he said. Fearing for their safety, “I told them, come back, don't stay there,” Delgado said.As the Terrible Herbst Trophy truck approached, it hit a large rock and lost control, causing a nearby group to scatter. Veering off the course, the truck initially headed straight for the spot where Delgado, his son, and three other members of the group had been standing. Guillermo Delgado remembers last month's off-road racing accident that took the lives of his two friends.Guillermo Delgado remembers last month's off-road racing accident that took the lives of his two friends. 

But it then made a sudden turn, Delgado said, skidding in the direction of Coronado and Padilla, spraying them with dirt before slamming into them, and killing them on the spot, he said. The driver and his co-pilot were unaware of what had just happened when their vehicle came to a stop by some bushes just off the track, Delgado said. He said said some ten minutes had gone by — the brother said no more than 20 minutes — when they watched as members of Herbst team arrived in pickups, and quickly drove off with the two racers. As they were being taken away the driver “was crying,” Guillermo Delgado said, while the navigator “could not be calmed down, he was devastated.” Omar Coronado.

Still in shock from the accident, the Delgados then watched as a man got into the Trophy Truck, and drove it away, despite members of the crowd telling him not to move it. The area did not have cellphone coverage, and it was impossible to call for help. When police did not arrive, Guillermo Delgado, his son, and a friend drove to get a signal, and find the nearest municipal police station in the Valle de la Trinidad, about 20 minutes away.

State investigators arrived on the scene about an hour after the incident, “but they just took statements and left,” Delgado said; it wasn't until after 9 pm that the state medical examiner's office arrived to take away the bodies.

More than a month later, Delgado said he does not blame the driver for the accident, but for leaving the scene. He also blames “our police system that did not arrest them” for doing so, and allowed them to get away.“They killed people, they didn't kill animals, why did they flee[?],” asked Rosa Edelia Arroyo Ceseña, Omar Coronado's mother. “If they had done this in the United States, they would have faced consequences. How can they do this in Mexico and just wash their hands of it?”As in the United States, it is illegal to leave scene of an accident, particularly when injury or death occurs, said Fernando López Alarcón, a Mexicali attorney with long experience investigating accidents in Mexico. “I think in any part of the world, when a driver runs into someone and takes off, that's obviously a crime.”

But Rosquillas, the civil protection chief, said that there can be extenuating circumstances in remote areas, where it can take a long time for authorities to respond, and racers involved in an accidents can become targets of angry spectators. In those cases, “I would go to the nearest police station and report the incident,” Rosquillas said. “The driver should show that he has no intention of evading the law,” he said. The Baja California Attorney General's Office confirmed that it is conducting an investigation for homicidio culposo, or manslaughter, in relation to the incident, but gave no details.

 Roger Norman, who heads SCORE, the Nevada-based sanctioning body that stages the San Felipe 250, the Baja 500 and the Baja 1000 flagship race, responded to a query that “this is in Mexico, it has no effect on the United States, the Mexican government is in charge of the races in Mexico, not the US media.”

A race 'fan', said SCORE “has made a big deal about when you get into an accident in Baja, you stay at the scene and you wait or you get help. They have insurance that covers you, you're not in trouble as long as you're in the race. ”Drivers are instructed to make contact with SCORE officials", but in remote areas where there is neither phone nor radio reception — as was the case in last month's accident.

***Baja Racing News LIVE! has proven most of the last points made by SCORE, as PURE BULL-SHIT.***


In a statement sent late Friday, SCORE International said it has implemented a number of safety measures, including the establishment of speed zones in several parts of the route that are monitored by satellite; a Stella tracking system that transmits the location of every racer, and notifies them if a racer has stopped for mechanical or medical reasons; the extension of barriers and fences and law enforcement and military presence along the course. The statement said that SCORE International “has provided all the information requested from the Baja California State Attorney General's Office for their investigation and will continue to cooperate with authorities.

”According to SCORE, the family members of the two victims have been contacted by legal representatives of the race team, and were expected to meet with them again this week. SCORE has not confirmed that Ed Herbst was the driver of the vehicle. 

But in a video interview posted on a Facebook page, which follows off-road events, Ed Herbst said he would be driving Trophy Truck number 91 on behalf of his brother Troy Herbst so as to secure his brother a spot in next month's Baja 500 race. 

Repeated to efforts to reach the Herbst team, or its representatives, were unsuccessful. Messages left at the family's Terrible Herbst convenience store business in Nevada and at the Terrible Herbst Motorsports office in Huntington Beach were not returned. The team's legal representative in Baja California answered an initial cellphone call on Friday, saying he was in a meeting and could not talk, and subsequently did not pick up."

***Editors Tip, You can run, but, you can't hide, From the TRUTH!***

***The race 'fan' cited in the piece was in fact, thrown out of the race sanction, for threatening the lives of spectators and racers alike, by "cheating".

Author contact: sandra.dibble@sduniontribune.com

*A Bizarre piece by the San Diego Reader, By Mike Madriaga:

Baja 250 races — two dead; racer scares Alpine kids and dad 10 Facebook message makes it worse By Mike Madriaga, April 16, 2018 

“I did not see him until the last second,” said Andy McMillin, “and it was the closest call I had. The fans down there in Baja California stand next to the race course and we call it “the parting of the seas” as our trucks approach a high-traffic spectator area.

[BJ Baldwin video depicts his truck going through the crowd area]

The viral video depicts a man watching about an arm's length away from McMillin’s trophy truck as he zoomed by going “80-100 miles per hour” at the Baja 250 race. The annual off-road race is managed by SCORE International and this day it was a 320-mile single loop race that started in San Felipe. McMillin is based out of Point Loma [San Diego] and is a five-time overall Baja 1000 champion. 

“The racers and the spectators know the risks” he said. “These are highly capable vehicles moving at high rates of speed and some people choose to stand right next to the race course to get the ultimate experience of watching us pass by.” On the same day, two other spectators were not as lucky. “The two people killed by the Herbst truck, was an accident,” said Yolie Stover from Alpine. “If the police would have said they intentionally hit them, they would have not have finished the race, and I guarantee that they would have gone to jail.” 

According to the Mexican newspapers “Ed Herbst, trophy truck driver #91, lost control of his vehicle and hit the two spectators, who were identified as Omar Corona Arroyo and Abelardo Padilla Camacho. Both were 38 years old.” 

Stover goes by the [']Off Road Girl Loves Baja['] moniker. She’s been capturing videos and photos of the off-road action since 1995. “The spectators need to stay back at least 50 feet,” she said. “It’s the spectators' responsibility to stay safe, keep back, and stay alert.” At times, she’s out by the race-course blowing her whistle and reminding the spectators to stand back and pick up their trash, but many don’t listen. “Unfortunately, fans do walk out and drive on to the course during races,” said Matt Scarpuzzi.

 “Drivers, race officials, and local Mexican police and security all discourage this, but again some of these races are over 1000 miles long and it is impossible to enforce boundaries for every mile.” Scarpuzzi, 38, is a fireman from Alpine that raced his UTV (utility task vehicle) this day, but broke down at race mile 102 and was not able to repair it to get back in the race. Scarpuzzi’s wife and two kids were watching the race. As the mother and her daughter stepped away from their area, three trucks rolled into their encampment. 

“Our son was one of the kids being frantically shuffled away by my good friend,” she said. “What happened with BJ Baldwin, Robby Gordon and even the eventual winner, Rob MacCachren, was they didn’t get back over to the marked course early enough,” said McMillin. “Rob made it through after zig-zagging around multiple spectators’ vehicles, and lost quite a bit of time. BJ and Robby tried to come back to the marked course and BJ ended up having to go over someone’s e-z up (tent).” 

On another video posted from a different angle, a kid could be heard screaming in Spanish. “Several drivers drove off course and took this access road to be able to drive faster.” Scarpuzzi said. “Once they got to the end of the road they tried to get back on course and thats when BJ decided to drive through the spectator area.” BJ posted the video on his Facebook and it read in part: “Thank you to those of you that cleared the way for me and allowed me to destroy your chairs, canopies and coolers to access the virtual checkpoint. Send me a direct message proving it was your camp, and I promise to replace them with even better [link deleted] canopies, chairs and coolers as well as a pallet of drinks to fill them with.” 

Scarpuzzi was livid when he saw the post, and responded. “There is no excuse for mowing down a spectator area to get ‘back in course.’ You can keep your [name deleted] e-z up and cooler. My 6-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter that dove under my truck to get out of your way, have no desire to support you or your sponsors. You had a choice to make at that moment, and you chose to endanger human life for a faster line. That is not what desert racing is about.”


*The racing community begins to realize the sanctioning body and the local government are responsible for enhancing safety elements of the Baja racing courses and activities. These are comments sent to Baja Racing News LIVE! relative to this very event:

*"Years ago the Mexican government on roads would put cars that were in actual car accidents were people died because of driving while drunk since many people are visual, I say have big tarps along the highways with what could possibly happen when people are to close to the race track and where and where not to spectate with also a message that with alcohol in the system you might be invincible".

*"It's not always the spectators. In the area where we were pitting, there were 2 race lines. As we left the area and were headed back out to the highway, we came upon a large group of people pitting about a 1/2 mile up course from us, some were big named TT teams. They had set up their pits on the secondary race line. I wonder how many race cars came thru their pits that they were not expecting?"

*"I pre-ran mile 290 back into town on Wednesday late in the afternoon. The number of 'lines' being run that weren't within 50, 100, even 300 feet of the course centerline and the bushes and pieces of trees used to cover their entrances where they left the marked course was obvious. A spectator out near mile 312 would have no safe place to watch the race and be within 500 feet of the course from what I saw. Maybe some of the issue can be reigned in with simply narrowing the course limits a bit."

*"Just from a pure business stand point, not to belittle the emotional cost which is imeasurable....but just in terms of dollars and sense, how much do each of these incidents cost SCORE? Kind of rhetorical, but just saying every single fatality has to have a financial impact. That impact is compounded by things like news coverage that portrays SCORE, it's management, etc in a bad light. No one wants Baja to not be Baja, but at the same time how long can this current approach be sustained? Can SCORE continue to work around these incidents for the long haul? Probably not a rational way to do it but would be interesting to see the raw numbers year to year, race to race. Not sure it would prove anything, but would be interesting to see how the numbers play out because if nothing else, it seems like the frequency of these incidents is increasing."

*"My guess is most of the spectators are just doing what the other spectators are doing. I'd bet most had no idea they were right in the middle of some of the preferred lines until they found TTs weaving through their camp/What if Score setup preferred spectator areas where needed? Put a Virtual checkpoint nearby so you know which line the racers are going to run, giving the fans guaranteed action and you can keep large numbers of spectators off the racing line. Dakar has something similar."

*"If Score would just stand up to what is in their own Rule bookthe Race Course is 60 ft from center right or left DO NOT RELEASE VCP's until 24hr before the start of the racethat way racers have to race the course. If you miss a VCP then you were not racing the courseI think this would help a lot."

*In the situation I was in, there were 2 race lines within 50ish feet of each other.Funny part was the big berm and turn at the end of that high speed section. There was a Virtual CP right at the entrance to the turn. We could hear the beep on the bikes as they passed a yellow pole stuck in the ground, so I assume that was the VCP SCORE stuck in the ground.The race course did a jog, right turn, go a ways, and then 2 left turns. If you hit the VCP and then went straight, over the berm, you would meet back up with the course. Several racers did some homework while prerunning and went straight up and over the berm. If you really wanted the race to take that turn, they should have put the VCP further up the course. Lucky that we were far enough out in the middle of nowhere (which is where we like to be), there was only one small family of spectators in our area."

Our favorite comments so far:

*Pistol Pete Sohren: "some may not like this but.....we need more vcp's and a more defined course, ESPECIALLY where we know spectators will be....hundreds of miles of new lines all over the desert is NOT the answer in my opinion.....doing your "homework" shouldn't be about making your own racetrack that is shorter than everyone else......at that race (San Felipe 250 2018) it was just proven that this tactic doesn't work anyway........those spectators where not in a bad spot, the racers taking "better" lines were"

*None of you have any idea what you are talking about. I have been in the car when this happens. I can tell you what its like to have eye contact with the person you are about to run over. I can tell you how many rocks were hitting the fenders as we were sliding. The unforgettable sound of a body hitting a car. None of you can understand what its like to make the call to Weatherman that you just hit a spectator. To see the lifeless body in front of you...........think about that for a minute......... The fact of the matter is that we all race with this dirty little secret. We all race with the price of human life. As racers we sign up for it. When we get in the car we all know the risk. Spectators do not sign up for this. They do not understand the risk. They do not have the understanding of what they are in for. They just believe, as do you and I, that it chances are it wont happen to them. None of them weigh the consequences. I mean really think, that they could die. None of them left their homes in the morning and said to this family and friends......"going to the race.....I might die.....maybe i'll see you later.....maybe not." Come on you guys....really? None of you really understand the reality of this. The price to be paid emotionally by both the drivers and the victims lacks translation here. The price not only to me, but to my family. A sport in which I love, has been a part of my identity for my whole life.....is now jaded. There is no insurance you guys. You are in a third world country and you have no rights. There is no "Innocent until proven guilty". They arrest first and ask questions later. There is no right to a speedy trial. You are at the mercy of a third world country government. You are a fool to think the US government will help you. Turn yourself over and hope it all works out? Who is taking care of your family while you rot in a foreign jail? And, by the way.....even when you are found to be free from guilt.......you still have to pay people (and they decide how much). Every race I fill out a litany of paperwork. List myself as a co-driver and wristband up. They have all of my information in triplicate. Ask me how many people from Score called to even see if I was OK. When this happens gang.....make no mistake....you are on your own. Here is what I will say....... The next time you see someone too close.....SAY SOMETHING! Do something! You know better....they do not.

And Roger......I'm calling you out. Running commercials on Mexican radio is not enough...........I dare you to do something. I dare you to take a stance on this and affect change. I dare you to get a hold of me and form a committee to improve safety. Don't sweep this opportunity under the carpet. The racers want it..........the spectators want it........it's your call. I dare you......

***Join-In to solve the problem! COMMENT HERE! 


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CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE SAN FELIPE 250 2018 DEATH RACE!

The Baja 500 2016 OUTRAGE!
 

Baja Racing News EXCLUSIVE! 

41 Years of DEATH! 

The Friends of SCORE, BFGoodrich Tires
*November 2018 The Exclusive Coverage*
UPDATED!  DEATH RACES SUNDAY PAPER SPECIAL! CLICK HERE



"Back in the days when I worked at National Speed Sport News, Chris Economaki told me that in the 1940s and ‘50s, it was a given that there would be at least one fatality every week at a racetrack somewhere in America. It’s mind-boggling to think that drivers regularly getting killed was the norm".

Now at SCORE-International, one person dies at EVERY race event!*
(*Current average [racer & spectator deaths] under current SCORE-International owner, Roger Norman)
                          ***

BAJA 500 2016 BFGoodrich Tires Kills American Child in Mexico CLICK HERE

                               Gary Newsome, Publisher BajaRacingNews.com

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